Wild

Orcas Hear Man’s Whistling And Circle Boat

August 6th, 2020

Orcinus Orca, commonly known as the Killer Whale are one of the world’s most powerful predators. Their striking black and white countershading adds to that powerful look and being the largest of the dolphins, are seriously deadly to seals, penguins, squid, and even seabirds.

But perhaps what’s even more amazing about them is that they are highly intelligent and social animals. They can communicate with a variety of sounds while they thrive as a family. Here’s proof.

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Pixabay Source: Pixabay

Richard Karoliussen spends his life studying Orcas.

The native Norwegian has always been fascinated with whales and has spent most of his life studying and interacting with these magnificent creatures. His dedication to his work has led him to many awesome encounters but it’s this one wherein he communicates with them with whistles that’s proven how sociable these mammals are.

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Pixabay Source: Pixabay

Together with Eve Jourdain, they co-founded Norwegian Orca Survey and while out on a trip for research, they chanced upon this pod of Orcas. Richard couldn’t help himself, He began to whistle knowing full well it’s how these whales communicate.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

And the whales responded.

One whale broke the surface to check and see who or what it was that was whistling. Maybe it was checking as to what exactly it was Richard was trying to say. He may have pronunciation issues after all. The beautiful whale swims back under the boat crossing to the other side before rising up again this time responding with a few whistles of its own.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

A few more whales arrive whistling back in response.

Those black and white swimmers look stunning under the surface of the water as they swim around the boat. Now it’s not clear what Richard is saying to the whales but the way they respond seems to be along the lines of playing and showing off. They begin to swim sideways around the boat with one of the whales even doing a backstroke exposing its white belly.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

The Orcas splash about with a few snorts here and there.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

If Richard was curious, so were the whales! It’s not everyday they get human visitors. Such beautiful creatures! These whales are so smart that they hunt together, using different techniques to capture their food. Similar to wolf packs some say.

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Pexels Source: Pexels

They can weigh up to six tons and grow to 32 feet.

They do look cute, and with personalities like these, it’s no wonder they endure that image of being such friendly marine mammals, though they can at times be dangerous.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Richard and Eve must have been so thrilled!

To spend their days doing research, dedicating their time to the preservation of the species, and to finally get some love back from the whales must have made it all worth it. Now if only there were subtitles…

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Pexels Source: Pexels

They were once hunted. Some found themselves in water parks for display and exhibitions where they perform stunts for crowds. In the wild, they find themselves threatened by lack of food, oil spills, and contaminants. It’s up to people like Richard and Eve to raise awareness in the hopes of preserving their numbers. Those whistles may have been a thank you.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

Check out Richard’s encounter with the Orcas in the video below!

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Source: YouTube, NOAA, inspire more

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